What to learn from my most dreary, time-consuming, and way-more-costly-than-it-should-have-been travel mess-up

Image for post
Image for post
NYC near Times Square. Photo by Andrew Fraieli

I graduated university on December 14th, 2017. At the time of my graduation ceremony, while others were walking across the stage, listening to professors they don’t care about talking about lessons they won’t remember, I was on my way to Ireland.

Flying to New York City first, I would then take a shuttle to Stewart International Airport about 90 minutes north of the city and take a plane to Dublin; I would spend a month in the UK and Ireland ignoring the sudden abyss of lacking of worldly…


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Andrew Fraieli

Between two destinations there is a bus stop; a train station; a sidewalk. There’s the place where you’re napping at a train station beside the evening bustle, or looking at a map in some crossroads between farmlands, or refueling in the dark silence of twilight at some highway town pit-stop. These places are somewhere neither here nor there, they are the in-between.

The in-between is not one place, nor one moment. It is a temptation and a mood, a default and an exception, a missed plane and a stressful moment. It is the precarious and odd balance on the spine…


It’s cheaper to pitch a tent outside the admininistration building than pay for a dorm.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Josh Giron

Originally published on Debt.com, Jan. 2018

Last semester, I didn’t just go to classes at Florida Atlantic University in South Florida. I lived there — in stairwells, on friend’s couches, even in a tent on the lawn out front of the administration building. Everywhere but in a dormitory.

Why? Two reasons. First, I wanted to save $5,000 to work on paying down a huge student loan balance. Second, I wanted to make a point about the high cost of college. Here’s what I did, and what I wanted to prove…

Stairwells Don’t Cost Rent

Before my final semester even started, I had decided to…


How one man spent 65 days in Europe for less than the cost of a Starbucks run

Image for post
Image for post

Article originally published on Debt.com, Nov. 2017

Ever heard of the book Europe on 5 Dollars a Day? It was written in 1957 by Arthur Frommer, and it’s become one of the best-known travel books ever written.

Obviously, it’s outdated — $5 in 1957 is $44.71 today. Who can do anything in Europe, the art and food capital of the world, on only $45 a day?

I did. On $8 a day, for 65 days.

I hitchhiked more than 2500 miles, went dumpster-diving…


Travelling far and wide and alone leads you to many people and connections, but you have to break those to move on, and it hurts.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Andrew Fraieli

To travel alone is not to be alone. You are in a state of mind that frees you from being hindered by how you thought before; your habits, your routines, your predispositions. You aren’t acting like yourself or whatever that may mean for anybody else. You are just there as a witness to see everything you put yourself to.

When you are alone, anybody around you could be a new friend or experience. The person…


Have some forethought when trying to camp in the Everglades in Florida and avoid my (multiple) mistakes

Image for post
Image for post

Simply reading the words, “What do you mean there’s no tent poles?” are not apt enough to describe the despair of my last trip to the Everglades.

There’s certain supplies and forethought you need to be prepared for a trip to Florida’s largest national park to prevent hearing this through gritted teeth. …

Andrew Fraieli

A journalist, photographer, designer and traveler, Andrew has hitchhiked over 2,500 miles and written on extreme budget travelling, homelessness, and more.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store